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Hot off the foothills: pink Himalayan salt

Gourmet cooking on a budget has never been so tempting, thanks to the launch of an exotic mountain salt, straight from the Himalayan Mountains.

‘The Salt Seller’ Whole Pink Himalayan Salt is a high grade, ancient salt, deposited several hundred million years ago in the foothills of the Himalayas.
 
The delicate pink tint is due to the high mineral content, contributing to the exquisite taste and healthy reputation.

 
The rich content of the salt boasts many trace elements, and over 84 minerals. There are numerous health benefits; its aids in toxin elimination, balancing the body’s pH and increasing circulation and conductivity.

 
Pink Himalayan salt reaches us in a state which is already of human food grade. Therefore, no refining is needed, and it keeps its range of natural minerals intact. ‘People are often told to use less salt in their diets, but by changing to whole salt, instead of refined salt, they can benefit from the rich natural mineral content’ says Lenni Smith, the founder. The minerals assist the body in achieving an ideal inner balance, which should be similar to that of seawater. Refined salt has its uses, but Lenni is encouraging us to use this whole salt on food, instead of reaching for salt-loaded snacks and meals.

 
In keeping with its natural source, the packaging is fully compostable and recyclable.
This Pink Himalayan Salt is retailing for £2.29 for 300g, ensuring you can add some sparkle to your culinary masterpieces, without compromising on quality or your bank balance.
1 Comments | Add a comment

COMMENTS

vaz frigerio
manchester
1
i once enthused to a european supplier of pink salt about the himalayan salt and was told it is dynamited out of pakistani hillsides without a permit and is therefore environmentally and ethically questionable

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17 July 2009
By: Alice MacKinnon
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